America is the leading narrative history because students love to read it. Additional coverage of immigration enhances the timeliness of the narrative. New Chapter Opener videos, History Skills Tutorials, and NortonÕs adaptive learning tool, InQuizitive, help students develop history skills, engage with the reading, and come to class prepared. What hasnÕt changed? Our unmatched affordability. Choose from Full, Brief (15% shorter), or The Essential Learning Edition--featuring fewer chapters and additional pedagogy.
Genre: History, Editor: W.W. Norton & Company, Pages: 12 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9780393668957


The best-selling storytelling approach with tools that develop history skills
Genre: , Editor: W. W. Norton, Pages: in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 0393878325


A book students love, now more streamlined and accessible. America has sold more than 1.8 million copies over the past eight editions because it’s a book that students enjoy reading. Effective storytelling, colorful anecdotes, and biographical sketches make the narrative absorbing and the material more memorable. The Ninth Edition includes refreshed and updated coverage of African American history and has been streamlined from 37 to 34 chapters.
Genre: History, Editor: W. W. Norton, Pages: 1008 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 0393912647


The best-selling storytelling approach with tools that develop history skills
Genre: , Editor: W. W. Norton, Pages: in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 0393882535


A quintessiantially American story chronicling Chinese American achievement in the face of institutionalized racism by the New York Times bestselling author of The Rape of Nanking In an epic story that spans 150 years and continues to the present day, Iris Chang tells of a people’s search for a better life—the determination of the Chinese to forge an identity and a destiny in a strange land and, often against great obstacles, to find success. She chronicles the many accomplishments in America of Chinese immigrants and their descendents: building the infrastructure of their adopted country, fighting racist and exclusionary laws and anti-Asian violence, contributing to major scientific and technological advances, expanding the literary canon, and influencing the way we think about racial and ethnic groups. Interweaving political, social, economic, and cultural history, as well as the stories of individuals, Chang offers a bracing view not only of what it means to be Chinese American, but also of what it is to be American.
Genre: History, Editor: Penguin, Pages: 512 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9781101126875


"Building the American Republic tells the story of United States with remarkable grace and skill, its fast moving narrative making the nation's struggles and accomplishments new and compelling. Weaving together stories of abroad range of Americans. Volume 1 starts at sea and ends on the field. Beginning with the earliest Americans and the arrival of strangers on the eastern shore, it then moves through colonial society to the fight for independence and the construction of a federal republic. Vol 2 opens as America struggles to regain its footing, reeling from a presidential assassination and facing massive economic growth, rapid demographic change, and combustive politics.
Genre: History, Editor: University of Chicago Press, Pages: 479 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9780226300825


With more than two million copies sold, America remains the leading narrative history survey text because it's a book that students enjoy reading. The Tenth Edition is both more relevant, offering increased attention to the culture of everyday life, and more accessible, featuring a reduced number of chapters and a streamlined narrative throughout. The Brief Edition is 20 percent shorter in total pages than its parent Full Edition.
Genre: History, Editor: W. W. Norton, Pages: 896 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 0393265986


A gripping narrative that brings to life a legendary moment in American history: the birth, life, and death of the Black Power movement With the rallying cry of "Black Power!" in 1966, a group of black activists, including Stokely Carmichael and Huey P. Newton, turned their backs on Martin Luther King's pacifism and, building on Malcolm X's legacy, pioneered a radical new approach to the fight for equality. Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour is a history of the Black Power movement, that storied group of men and women who would become American icons of the struggle for racial equality. Peniel E. Joseph traces the history of the men and women of the movement—many of them famous or infamous, others forgotten. Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour begins in Harlem in the 1950s, where, despite the Cold War's hostile climate, black writers, artists, and activists built a new urban militancy that was the movement's earliest incarnation. In a series of character-driven chapters, we witness the rise of Black Power groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Black Panthers, and with them, on both coasts of the country, a fundamental change in the way Americans understood the unfinished business of racial equality and integration. Drawing on original archival research and more than sixty original oral histories, this narrative history vividly invokes the way in which Black Power redefined black identity and culture and in the process redrew the landscape of American race relations.
Genre: History, Editor: Henry Holt and Company, Pages: 416 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9781466837614


This new updated edition of How the Swans Came to the Lake includes much new information about recent events in Buddhist groups in America and discusses such issues as spiritual authority, the role of women, and social action.
Genre: Religion, Editor: Shambhala Publications, Pages: 592 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9780834843905


Named one of the ten best books of the year by the Chicago Tribune A Publishers Weekly best book of 2019 | A 2019 NPR Staff Pick A pathbreaking history of the United States’ overseas possessions and the true meaning of its empire We are familiar with maps that outline all fifty states. And we are also familiar with the idea that the United States is an “empire,” exercising power around the world. But what about the actual territories—the islands, atolls, and archipelagos—this country has governed and inhabited? In How to Hide an Empire, Daniel Immerwahr tells the fascinating story of the United States outside the United States. In crackling, fast-paced prose, he reveals forgotten episodes that cast American history in a new light. We travel to the Guano Islands, where prospectors collected one of the nineteenth century’s most valuable commodities, and the Philippines, site of the most destructive event on U.S. soil. In Puerto Rico, Immerwahr shows how U.S. doctors conducted grisly experiments they would never have conducted on the mainland and charts the emergence of independence fighters who would shoot up the U.S. Congress. In the years after World War II, Immerwahr notes, the United States moved away from colonialism. Instead, it put innovations in electronics, transportation, and culture to use, devising a new sort of influence that did not require the control of colonies. Rich with absorbing vignettes, full of surprises, and driven by an original conception of what empire and globalization mean today, How to Hide an Empire is a major and compulsively readable work of history.
Genre: History, Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, Pages: 528 in PDF, Epub, Mobi, ISBN: 9780374715120